$7 Sundays! Soda Basics: Making Ginger Ale

image courtesy reeselloyd
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Taught by Jonathan Soma

Soma was born in the South, is what someone from the North would say. He co-founded the Brainery, is the sciencey half of Masters of Social Gastronomy, has more hobbies than can dance on the head of a pin, and loves Waffle House about eighteen times more than you.

See more @dangerscarf

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We've got a new monthly thing going on - $7 Sundays (yes, they're actually $5, but "Five Dollar Sundays" doesn't have that alliteration!). Super cheap drop-in classes where you get to hang out with a ton of neat people while learning the very basics of something, inspired by our Kimchi Party. This time around it's making ginger ale!

Tired of being bound to high-fructose corn syrup? Making soda at home is a super easy process, and we're here to help you get started! You bring an empty plastic 2-liter or 20-ounce container, you leave with a batch of ginger ale.

...or is it ginger beer? Although these days the big difference between the two is spiciness and marketing (not alcohol!), we'll skim over the history of carbonated drinks and the gingers in particular. There's a reason it's called "Canada Dry!"

Want it spicy? Citrusy? Raspberry-y? We'll talk about how to flavoring your ginger ale, and the uses of a nice heavily-spiced ginger beer (which may or may not all involve actual alcohol).

Fun Wikipedia fact: ginger ale was the most popular drink in the United States between 1860 and 1930. Did it cause the Civil War? I do not believe so.

This class is drop-in style - feel free to show up any time between 1 and 5 PM. You'll need to pre-register, though, because there are only a limited number of spots this time around! Can't fit 300 people in 500 square feet, y'know? 

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